don't believe the hype

vegan-vulcan:

raccoon-eater:

lacigreen:

lalatinafeminista:

toomanyfuckscrusader:

hiddlefun:

cloudcuckoolander527:

talisguy:

Signal boosting in case anyone needed to know this. 

This is informative as heck. Show this to everyone!

This is actually some great info! Why can’t they teach this kind of thing in school??

Wow, I’ve taken health and sex ed three times during my educational process and never learned any of this. Thanks.

Definitely some important information here!

this is supa awesome.  i do think it should be noted that side effects of EC *really* vary.  when I took EC I didn’t have any symptoms whatsoever.  

The more you know~

When I took EC, my period went missing for three months. Freaked me the hell out, despite having negative pregnancy tests. You cannot imagine how relieved I was to have it back.

I took it once and I slept for like 24 hours straight. The side effects are really different for everyone. 

princess-passion-flower:

stonedpervert:

thelittlestonedfox:

I usually don’t reblog these but oh my god

i love retail robin

That bird is on point.

yall dont understand how accurate

glitterpiggies:

Molly enjoying a chin rub.

texasassy:

I swear dogs know the meaning of “no” better than men

dynastylnoire:

youngblackandvegan:

she is just beautiful!

she just radiates

soycrates:

When people brag about being able to get the newest, fanciest tasty vegan food on the market like, “Oh? You haven’t tried Beyond Meat yet? How sad! I pity you! *swirls fair trade vegan wine in glass and cackles*

"You haven’t made a triple layer ice cream cake out of cashews and coconut oil? But why, you poor soul! Coconut oil is on sale at Foody Whole Villa, it’s only 300 dollars per 3ml!”

That’s the shit that gets us all depicted as rich white spoiled brats. Putting what the general public thinks of veganism aside, it’s also really fucking annoying, especially for vegan people who can barely afford soap this month.

bootieshunter:

Mija can still be a little too enthusiastic when it comes to making frans

fightingforanimals:

Somebody just messaged me on facebook begging me to help. A romanian stray dog shelter is struggling to feed the dogs they have rescued. 

Most of you know the situation in Romania. And despite there being a brief ‘break’ right now regarding the dogs’ slaughter, it is still going on. And in shelters where dogs are *safe* right now, they are still terrified, dirty and in desperate need of sponsorship and adoption. 

PLEASE DONATE IF YOU CAN - MONEY, BLANKETS, DOG FOOD, ANYTHING. YOU CAN ALSO VOLUNTEER IF YOU LIVE NEARBY!

Please spread the word if you cannot donate. 

Here is a link to their facebook page too.

carnism-is:

austinmcmann224:

How the fuck do you eat vegan

There’s literally nothing on this planet that could possibly not come from animals. Plants are animals, so you can’t eat anything they produce (technically).

Non-Vegans: 1

Vegans: 0

"Plants are animals."

Are you trolling or did you sleep during every science class you took from 1st grade and on?

this is the best lmao

Stop Abusing Turtles and Frogs for Entertainment
356
earthandanimals:


Swimming pigs at Staniel Cay by Nhat Phan

earthandanimals:

Swimming pigs at Staniel Cay by 

moltres:

overhearing a conversation between strangers in which they’re saying something completely wrong and you really feel like correcting them

image

ollietherottweiler:

africandogontheprairie:

Your choice affects your dog’s choice — a lesson I’m reminded of everyday. (Image credit goes to Lili Chin.)
Way back this winter, when Chalo started having growly reactions toward other dogs, I made the mistake of correcting him for it. Traditional wisdom and all the training books I’d read as a kid in the ’90s told me firm discipline was necessary, so I spoke sternly and used physical corrections with a choke collar. Surprise: in just 48 hours, it became so much worse. A little growliness turned into full-on explosions of snarling and lunging and raised hackles and high emotions. The changes were happening so quickly it frightened me. This was not a dog I recognized. So I backtracked, devoured every bit of reactivity literature I could find on the internet, and soon wondered if, in Chalo’s mind, the situation looked very different. To him, it seemed to be, “Every time we see a dog, my person gets worried and bad things happen. She becomes a person I do not recognize. I need to growl more to make that dog go away, and to keep bad things from happening.” My whole perspective on the issue changed — or at least, made me more receptive to alternatives, out of desperation and concern that I was singlehandedly ruining my dog.
The next day I approached it differently, with a soft, open, patient mindset and a bag full of cheese. And in one session, Chalo was sitting quietly and sweetly, twenty feet away from the golden retriever who previously sent him into a growling frenzy.
In one week, he was walking past yards of snarling, lunging, barking, frustrated dogs with the same sweet, quiet, expectant look on his face.
Today, Chalo hasn’t growled at another dog in months.
I definitely don’t propose that there is any one-size-fits-all training method for every dog, and everything I don’t know about dogs could fill several rooms several times over. But Chalo teaches me so much, all the time: how to be a better teacher, how to approach problems creatively, how to be patient, how to motivate. So many canine behavior problems are misunderstandings, rooted partly in a failure of human imagination and empathy. And that is fixable. That can change. Chalo continues to show me what I need to give more of, not just in dog training but in life in general — reflection on my own actions, and consideration for how we all can be shaped, battered, or buoyed by the world around us. Dogs can make us better, and this dog is making me better. 

important

And if your dog is already in a further stage where they don’t even have any attention left for positive reinforcement or anything else, just create a distance between the two dogs and walk further without speaking or giving any attention to your dog while they’re lashing out at the other dog. Just walk ahead slowly, but don’t stand still and don’t give any attention to the situation whatsoever. It’s also really important to give your dog some space on the leash and not hold them too tight, otherwise they won’t be able to communicate with each other through head movements, which can cause even worse behavior.
When your dog starts ignoring the other dog (for example when they’re out of sight), praise them excessively. Because of the distance you’re creating, the lack of reaction they’re receiving from you ànd the praise for their good behavior, their behavior towards other dogs may vanish after some time. 
There are lots of different methods, but it’s really important to not let it get this far. Approaching other dogs on a leash is very unnatural for dogs and can even cause aggressive behavior in the long term. Immediately act on it when your dogs starts showing problematic behavior, or get help from a professional.

ollietherottweiler:

africandogontheprairie:

Your choice affects your dog’s choice — a lesson I’m reminded of everyday. (Image credit goes to Lili Chin.)

Way back this winter, when Chalo started having growly reactions toward other dogs, I made the mistake of correcting him for it. Traditional wisdom and all the training books I’d read as a kid in the ’90s told me firm discipline was necessary, so I spoke sternly and used physical corrections with a choke collar. Surprise: in just 48 hours, it became so much worse. A little growliness turned into full-on explosions of snarling and lunging and raised hackles and high emotions. The changes were happening so quickly it frightened me. This was not a dog I recognized. So I backtracked, devoured every bit of reactivity literature I could find on the internet, and soon wondered if, in Chalo’s mind, the situation looked very different. To him, it seemed to be, “Every time we see a dog, my person gets worried and bad things happen. She becomes a person I do not recognize. I need to growl more to make that dog go away, and to keep bad things from happening.” My whole perspective on the issue changed — or at least, made me more receptive to alternatives, out of desperation and concern that I was singlehandedly ruining my dog.

The next day I approached it differently, with a soft, open, patient mindset and a bag full of cheese. And in one session, Chalo was sitting quietly and sweetly, twenty feet away from the golden retriever who previously sent him into a growling frenzy.

In one week, he was walking past yards of snarling, lunging, barking, frustrated dogs with the same sweet, quiet, expectant look on his face.

Today, Chalo hasn’t growled at another dog in months.

I definitely don’t propose that there is any one-size-fits-all training method for every dog, and everything I don’t know about dogs could fill several rooms several times over. But Chalo teaches me so much, all the time: how to be a better teacher, how to approach problems creatively, how to be patient, how to motivate. So many canine behavior problems are misunderstandings, rooted partly in a failure of human imagination and empathy. And that is fixable. That can change. Chalo continues to show me what I need to give more of, not just in dog training but in life in general — reflection on my own actions, and consideration for how we all can be shaped, battered, or buoyed by the world around us. Dogs can make us better, and this dog is making me better. 

important

And if your dog is already in a further stage where they don’t even have any attention left for positive reinforcement or anything else, just create a distance between the two dogs and walk further without speaking or giving any attention to your dog while they’re lashing out at the other dog. Just walk ahead slowly, but don’t stand still and don’t give any attention to the situation whatsoever. It’s also really important to give your dog some space on the leash and not hold them too tight, otherwise they won’t be able to communicate with each other through head movements, which can cause even worse behavior.

When your dog starts ignoring the other dog (for example when they’re out of sight), praise them excessively. Because of the distance you’re creating, the lack of reaction they’re receiving from you ànd the praise for their good behavior, their behavior towards other dogs may vanish after some time. 

There are lots of different methods, but it’s really important to not let it get this far. Approaching other dogs on a leash is very unnatural for dogs and can even cause aggressive behavior in the long term. Immediately act on it when your dogs starts showing problematic behavior, or get help from a professional.